Lone Tree

Sky Ridge scores high on safety

Consumer Reports weighs multiple factors in ratings

Lone Tree’s Sky Ridge Medical Center topped a Consumer Reports’ list of safest Denver-area hospitals. Photo by Jane Reuter
By Jane Reuter
Posted

Two Douglas County hospitals topped a Consumer Reports list of hospital safety for the Denver metro area.

Lone Tree’s Sky Ridge Medical Center and Parker Adventist were rated first and second among 16 metro-area hospitals, based on five categories related to hospital safety.

Sky Ridge scored 66 of a possible 100 points, and Parker Adventist, 65. Each of the five categories included 20 possible points relating to infections, readmissions, patient communications, necessary procedures and mortality.

“We are thrilled,” Sky Ridge CEO Maureen Tarrant said. “This particular recognition by Consumer Reports is a gold star. All of us consider Consumer Reports the go-to place for being rigorous in your analysis and determination of providing guest services and products. To be added to that list for such an important service — hospital care — just makes us all tremendously proud.

“We’re very proud to have achieved this within about 10 years of opening.”

So is Parker Adventist, which opened just six months after Sky Ridge in early 2004.

“This ranking really supports our belief that here at Parker Adventist we deliver some of the highest-quality medical care in the metro area,” said hospital spokeswoman Rachel Robinson. “Quality and patient safety is a top priority for us.”

Among agencies that provide health-care ratings, Tarrant said Consumer Reports is the most comprehensive.

“It not only includes traditionally publicly reported statistics such as infection rates, but it even looks at about four different categories of performance,” she said. “Those include patient satisfaction and evidence-based medicine protocols, such as how much radiation you get when you get CAT scans at Sky Ridge. Those four categories are really very, very comprehensive.”

Consumer Reports’ mortality ratings are based on how likely patients are to die within 30 days of hospital admittance for a heart attack, heart failure or pneumonia. It also considers how often surgery patients with treatable complications die during their stay.

The data is based on patients aged 65 and older.