Lone Tree gets high marks from Money magazine

Seventh-best ranking for livability based on updated criteria

Posted 9/26/17

A recent study by Time, Inc.'s Money magazine ranked Lone Tree as the seventh-best city to live in the United States, out of a total of 2,400 cities evaluated.

This year marks the 30th time the magazine has published the study, and different …

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Lone Tree gets high marks from Money magazine

Seventh-best ranking for livability based on updated criteria

Posted

A recent study by Time, Inc.'s Money magazine ranked Lone Tree as the seventh-best city to live in the United States, out of a total of 2,400 cities evaluated.

This year marks the 30th time the magazine has published the study, and different criteria are considered each year. This year's study focused on cities with a population range from 10,000 to 100,000, based on factors including cost of living to public school performance.

Money reporter Kerri Anne Renzulli explained in an email that the choice to look at smaller cities reflected the trend of homebuyers seeking neighborhoods outside of larger, costlier cities.

“Avoiding the biggest cities to focus on smaller towns and affordable suburbs was driven by our desire to scout out the best bargains and raise the profile of many wonderful places across the country,” Renzulli said. They “may lack the big-name familiarity of larger locales but still have plenty to offer in terms of low cost of living, growing economies, and good schools.”

Cities with more than double the national crime risk or where more than 95 percent of the population is white were eliminated from the list, as were towns earning less than 85 percent of the state's median income.

Other factors considered were projected job growth, commuting costs, county-level high school graduation rates and access to amenities like restaurants, museums, sports complexes and green spaces.

“We are very honored … I believe this is a reflection of our council, city staff and residents working together,” Mayor Lone Tree Jackie Millet said via email. “We are very happy to see our hard work paying off."

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