Love of West shows in art at rec center, gallery

Littleton-area painter depicts bison, iconic landscapes

Posted 9/17/18

Arturo Garcia isn't from the American West, but he was captivated by its distinctive lands and deep history. “Colorado is a beautiful state — it's easy to get inspired by the mountains, the …

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Love of West shows in art at rec center, gallery

Littleton-area painter depicts bison, iconic landscapes

Posted

Arturo Garcia isn't from the American West, but he was captivated by its distinctive lands and deep history.

“Colorado is a beautiful state — it's easy to get inspired by the mountains, the lakes,” said Garcia, 43, a Littleton-area artist currently featured at Goodson Recreation Center in Centennial.

Originally from Mexico, Garcia has lived in Colorado for the last 10 years, and his painting changed when he relocated. Enthralled by the history of bison and their place in Native American culture, he set out to highlight that relationship with his art. One piece of that is the colorful dots painted on the bison in his work, which represent their spirit, he said.

Native tribes “flourished with the buffalo being a central part in their lives,” Garcia said, noting the use of the animal for food, utensils, tools and even spiritual connection.

The influx of European settlers in the West led to a decline in the bison population, and Garcia wants his audience to be interested in the history and conservation of the animal.

“I find it beneficial to know about our dark parts (in history), so we can learn about and not repeat them,” Garcia said. “As an artist, I'm somewhat responsible to paint a subject that sheds light on truth, to inspire consciousness, to act in fairness.”

Garcia's work will be featured at the recreation center at 6315 S. University Blvd. until Sept. 28, and the pieces are for sale. His work can also be found at Willow — An Artisan's Market at 2400 W. Main St. in Littleton. More information on Garcia is available at www.arturogarciafineart.com.

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