Master gardeners give green light to growing

Experts share tips for raising plants in Colorado

Posted 7/2/18

Anyone who’s tried to grow so much as a tomato in Colorado knows how tricky gardening can be here. Thankfully, gardeners flummoxed by the difficulties of mile-high growing can stop by Littleton’s …

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Master gardeners give green light to growing

Experts share tips for raising plants in Colorado

Posted

Anyone who’s tried to grow so much as a tomato in Colorado knows how tricky gardening can be here. Thankfully, gardeners flummoxed by the difficulties of mile-high growing can stop by Littleton’s Hudson Gardens to lean on the expertise of the Master Gardeners of Colorado State University’s County Extension program.

A team of dedicated gardeners, trained and certified by the university’s Arapahoe County Extension office, nurtures and maintains Hudson Gardens’ 23 raised vegetable and herb beds, and hosts twice-monthly “Meet the Gardeners” events through the end of September.

“We grow the standard things: tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, beets, carrots, beans and squash,” said Master Gardener Debbie Moody. “We also do some unusual stuff: artichokes, okra and kohlrabi, for instance. All our raised beds are at a height that’s comfortable for people in wheelchairs or who use walkers. We want to demonstrate that all kinds of people can garden at home.”

The garden’s produce goes to the food bank at Integrated Family Community Services, Moody said.

Master Gardeners undergo a rigorous process to earn their title, said Donna Farley-Wade, who also helps maintain the garden.

“We don’t give out opinion or our personal observations — none of that folklore stuff you hear a lot,” Farley-Wade said. “We do, however, have lots of evidence-based data to share. Stuff that’s been tested.”

The Hudson Garden group’s goal is to connect as many people as possible with the joys of growing their own food, said Master Gardener Ashley Cleveland.

“Everyone can garden in some way,” Cleveland said. “Even if you’re in an apartment, you can grow herbs, lettuce, or even just houseplants. Gardening is healing and grounding.”

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