Q&A with Chris Holbert, state senator for District 30

Posted 1/7/19

Chris Holbert, R-Parker, serves state Senate District 30, which in addition to unincorporated areas near Parker, includes Highlands Ranch, Lone Tree, Roxborough Park and Sedalia. The business …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Q&A with Chris Holbert, state senator for District 30

Posted

Chris Holbert, R-Parker, serves state Senate District 30, which in addition to unincorporated areas near Parker, includes Highlands Ranch, Lone Tree, Roxborough Park and Sedalia. The business consultant was elected to his first term in the state Senate in 2014 and re-elected last year. Previously, he served in the state House.

Colorado Community Media did a brief Q&A with Holbert ahead of the opening of the 2019 legislative session, which began Jan. 4.

What is the most important issue for the Legislature to tackle this session, and what needs to be done?

Revenue projections indicate that Colorado taxpayers will send over one billion more dollars over-and-above a previously projected increase in revenues. That's not a one billion dollar increase over last year's revenues — it's one billion dollars more than the expected increase for this year. Within TABOR limits and after honoring any required refunds to taxpayers, the General Assembly should allocate a significant portion of that “new revenue” to roads and bridges. Taxpayers are right to refuse tax increases unless and until the government is more accountable for the already increasing tax revenues they send to us.

Tell us about two pieces of legislation that you plan to sponsor.

After working through the past 32 months since the passage of Senate Bill 16-197, Colorado grocery and convenience stores are now selling full-strength beer. Last year, we addressed several unanswered questions regarding that conversion. In 2019, I will address an unintended consequence of those prior legislative efforts. That is, to allow several rural small businesses, some of which have existed for nearly a century, from having to conform to policies that work in urban settings where choice and competition prevail. I'll also be working to establish a bill of rights for persons protected through a guardianship.

What must be accomplished for this session to be deemed a success?

It is important for constituents to keep in mind that our state constitution defines a legislative process that is based on the rule of simple majority. With one party in control of our state House, Senate and governor's office, there is no motion, rule, tactic or strategy that can be used within that process to stop that majority. Thus, a successful session would involve House and Senate Democrats legislating with an even hand. Short of that, it would involve constituents making their voices heard to the one party that holds complete control over that process for the next two years.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.