Bikes part of Lone Tree's future

RidgeGate Parkway project will include detached lane for cyclists

Posted 9/3/19

In a city proud of its ability to offer options for how one commutes in the city, cycling may be the next frontier. The city's main roadways don't lend themselves to cyclists — yet. Lincoln Avenue, …

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Bikes part of Lone Tree's future

RidgeGate Parkway project will include detached lane for cyclists

Posted

In a city proud of its ability to offer options for how one commutes in the city, cycling may be the next frontier.

The city's main roadways don't lend themselves to cyclists — yet. Lincoln Avenue, Yosemite Street and Park Meadows Drive are the big three roadways in the city. Some areas have painted bike lanes. Howard Moore, a member of the city's citizen's recreation committee, said he applauds the city for its initiative to accommodate cyclists, but more can be done.

MORE: Safety advocates seek to stop cyclist fatality trend

“They did a great job to keep the Willow Creek Trail open during all that E-470 construction,” Moore said. “I would like to see more bike lanes in the city.”

The city recently undertook a $27 million project to widen the east side of RidgeGate Parkway and add a detached bike lane extending to about Peoria Street. It fits with the city's vision for the area as a bustling throughway for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. A detached bike lane, or protected bike lane, is a bike lane protected by objects like flower planters or parked cars. The concept is frequently seen in downtown areas like Denver's.

Other than that, most cyclists in Lone Tree use the Willow Creek Trail, which extends north toward the Denver Tech Center, convenient for the bike-to-worker.

The city conducted a community survey in 2016, in which it asked about residents' participation in various recreational activities.

Of the 1,213 respondents, 55% said they biked on trails or sidewalks in the city as an activity, which is down from 64% in 2009, according to the survey on the city's website, CityofLoneTree.com. There are about 20 miles of paved and unpaved trails in Lone Tree, including the Bluffs, an area technically outside city limits, and Wildcat Trail on the western boundary of the city. There are about 17 miles of painted bike lanes on the streets. No cyclist has died in the past 10 years on Lone Tree streets, according to city officials.

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