Douglas County election: a test run for 2020

The commission prepares for the next three elections

Posted 11/11/19

Workers at the Douglas County election commission were able to kick their feet up and rest for a day the Friday following the Nov. 5 election thanks to success in what they considered a …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Douglas County election: a test run for 2020

The commission prepares for the next three elections

Posted

Workers at the Douglas County election commission were able to kick their feet up and rest for a day the Friday following the Nov. 5 election thanks to success in what they considered a “test-run” for the 2020 election.

The commission reported that virtually all ballots were counted the night of the election, said Merlin Klotz, the county's clerk and recorder.

“Operationally it was a very good election,” he said. “It was as good as we've ever had.”

While things were speedy this year, he expects counting for next year's presidential election to bleed into the following days due to higher turnout.

“We will be scanning ballots Wednesday and even Thursday,” he said.

Klotz adds that the paper ballot system used in Colorado may be slower but it's much more secure than an electronic one.

This year's election was unique in that it precedes three coming in 2020: the Democratic primary, the state primary and the general election.

While this was a smaller election than the ones on tap next year, it allowed the commission to test out recent facility changes they made, he said.

“This was the warm-up,” Klotz said.

In terms of the volume of ballots, the election was on par with what the commission expected, which follows a general rule of 30% of votes coming in at the beginning, 30% in the middle and 40% in the very end, he said.

This year, 50% of votes came in election day and the day before, according to election data.

More than 42% of registered voters cast their ballots in the coordinated election compared to about 38% in 2017 and 41% in 2015.

Local voters came out strongly against state proposition CC with more than 62% of respondents choosing “no.” The decision for state proposition DD was a closer race with nearly 54% of voters selecting “yes.” Statewide, CC failed and DD narrowly passed.

Now, the commission will complete “ballot cures” for people whose signatures didn't match or had other issues with their ballot. That will last eight days and then the final certification of votes will be submitted to the secretary of state on Nov. 29.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.