Fall fest draws pumpkin pickers, wagon riders

Posted 10/8/19

Selena Miesbauer said her favorite thing about fall is anything to do with pumpkins. So much so, she came to the Schweiger Ranch Fall Festival in Lone Tree on Oct. 5 in search of a pumpkin big enough …

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Fall fest draws pumpkin pickers, wagon riders

Posted

Selena Miesbauer said her favorite thing about fall is anything to do with pumpkins. So much so, she came to the Schweiger Ranch Fall Festival in Lone Tree on Oct. 5 in search of a pumpkin big enough to fit her 10-month-old daughter, Presley, for a photo op. The Miesbauers, of Highlands Ranch, had no such luck this time, but that didn't necessarily rule out a cute pumpkin patch picture.

The Schweiger Ranch Fall Festival is held annually during the first week of October. The city-sponsored event gave city folks a taste of life on the historic ranch with wagon rides, a petting zoo and a tour of the grounds and the ranch house.

“We have such a great and unique venue we get to use here, which is really drawing to people," said event planner Allisa Dailey.

The Schweiger Ranch was founded in 1874 by John and Joseph Schweiger, two immigrants from Austria, according to the Schweiger Ranch Foundation website. The land was sold to RidgeGate Investments in 1972 and the ranch was converted into an educational and cultural facility in the early 2000s.

Dailey said over the years the ranch has seen some updates to keep people coming year after year and the goal of the festival each year is to give people a place to take in fall right in their backyard.

“The pumpkins, the petting zoo, wagon rides,” Dailey said, “are just the extras.”

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