Former Lone Tree councilmember dies at 77

Harold Anderson is remembered for his kindness and dedication to arts and city

Thelma Grimes
tgrimes@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 6/8/21

Harold Anderson, a former Lone Tree city councilmember, is remembered as a kind man who cared deeply for his city and contributed greatly to the arts and programs citizens enjoy. Anderson died May 25 …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2020-2021, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Former Lone Tree councilmember dies at 77

Harold Anderson is remembered for his kindness and dedication to arts and city

Posted

Harold Anderson, a former Lone Tree city councilmember, is remembered as a kind man who cared deeply for his city and contributed greatly to the arts and programs citizens enjoy.

Anderson died May 25 after experiencing health problems.

In a tribute posted on the city's website, Lone Tree Mayor Jackie Millet said, “Harold's passion, commitment, and contributions to the City of Lone Tree were significant and lasting. While he may be best remembered for his support of the Lone Tree Arts Center, he was also a key leader in building the foundation for Lone Tree's bright future.”

Anderson, 77, played a key role in getting Lone Tree established. He was involved in the campaign to get the city incorporated in 1995. Over the years, he served on the city's Arts Commission before moving into the role as elected councilman in 2008. He served on the city council for eight years.

District 1 Councilmember Jay Carpenter said, “Harold Anderson was one of the most genuine and sincere individuals I have ever met. He was extremely thoughtful and passionate about the City of Lone Tree. I currently occupy his seat on the dais, and it is an honor to serve in the same role that he did so eloquently. He certainly has left a mark on the city and within the community as a whole. He will be missed but never forgotten.”

In 2008, Anderson was part of a small group of art advocates that led the campaign to fund the construction of the Lone Tree Arts Center.

Along with his wife, Ada, Anderson continued supporting Lone Tree arts programs. In 2019, the couple purchased "Mountain Spell," the white sculpture that welcomes visitors at the entrance of the arts center.

According to the city, Anderson was a tireless advocate for the arts. He was instrumental in the commissioning and placement of a variety of unique pieces of public art that contribute to Lone Tree's character today.

Paul Ackerman, interim executive director of the Lone Tree Art Center, said he first met Anderson in 2011. At the time, Ackerman said he learned quickly that the Andersons would be strong supporters of the arts center.

Today, Ackerman said everywhere you look at the Lone Tree Arts Center, Anderson's impact is there.

From the sculpture at the front door to the programming of the upcoming season, Ackerman said Anderson's contributions are there. Anderson put the arts center in touch with Grammy-nominated saxophonist Gerald Albright, who is now hosting a new jazz series. 

“Typical Harold, always putting people together, always thinking of what might be possible,” Ackerman said. “I am sure I am not the first to tell you that Harold was one of those characters who never met a stranger.”

Longtime friend Cory Cullinan said Anderson will be missed. Cullinan said he first met Anderson when he was campaigning for city council and knocked on the door.

“Harold was one of my heroes,” he said. “He was more than 30 years my senior, but I considered him one of my favorite people and greatest friends in Lone Tree.”

As kind words and support have poured in, Ada said she is not surprised. The couple was married 57 years and had one daughter.

“Knowing all he's done and all the friends he's had,” Ada said, “I am not surprised. Lone Tree was an important part of his life for more than 20 years. He decided in the later part of his life that he would dedicate it to the city.”

Even as his health was failing, Ada said Anderson would keep track of everything happening at the arts center and with the city.

Anderson was buried at a private service in Breckenridge. A larger, public service will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 12 at the Littleton United Methodist Church, 5894 S. Datura St.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.