Kristi Hoopes, 22, formerly on 'The Voice,' talks about milestone

Local singer releases debut EP

Nick Puckett
npuckett@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 12/15/20

Editor's note: This article has been edited for length. To read the full interview, visit ColoradoCommunityMedia.com. Parker country singer Kristi Hoopes released her first EP Nov. 25, a culmination …

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Kristi Hoopes, 22, formerly on 'The Voice,' talks about milestone

Local singer releases debut EP

Posted

Editor's note: This article has been edited for length. To read the full interview, visit ColoradoCommunityMedia.com.

Parker country singer Kristi Hoopes released her first EP Nov. 25, a culmination of two years of fundraising efforts.

“Life of the Party” is available for download on Apple Music. Three years removed from appearing on the singing competition show “The Voice,” Hoopes, 22, began work right away on her first record. Her first single, “Don't Worry Mama,” was released Aug. 21, her first piece of original music since 2014, she said.

Hoopes, a Legend High School graduate, competed on Season 13 of “The Voice” in 2017. She began the fundraising efforts for her EP in 2018 via Indiegogo. She graduated from Middle Tennessee State University and lives in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, with her fiancé, Tucker Huseth.

Colorado Community Media spoke with Hoopes about her milestone accomplishment, and the work yet to be done.

What have you been up to in the past few months?

I've been absorbed with the whole EP release. Most of it is getting the CD and merchandise products. It's been crazy getting everything together and preparing for the release. That's pretty much been absorbing 100% of my time.

Do you still find time to work on your music?

When I do get those spare moments and my brain needs a break, it goes to writing music. In the middle of all this, I've been writing new music and working on the next thing, so there's been a lot of balls juggling in the air.

With live performances out of the picture, how are you working around promoting your EP?

It's been strange, for sure. Not being able to tour on (the EP) was an unforeseen part of the release. The workaround for that: I have more video content planned that was filmed live to show people what it would sound like in a live setting. I'm also doing a lot Skype concerts. Quite a few people who contributed to the EP got a Skype or Facetime concert. I'm looking forward to that as well. It's going to be a small setting. I'll have two people backing me up. We'll all be wearing masks and all those things.

What's the next thing you're working on?

We're already working on the next — I don't know if it's going to be the next record or next set of singles, but I've already been in the process of tracking and writing what I want in this next project. I'm looking into something that leans into more of that country-funk style — that's something I've really grasped onto. I really want to lean into that country-funk sound. I'm excited to work on a project that goes a little deeper in that sound.

Have you received a lot of support from people in Parker?

I've had an old teacher from Legend (High School) and Iron Horse (Elementary) reach out to me and send just the sweetest messages. It's just cool to be remembered in that way and to have people from your hometown acknowledge that they knew all the way back then— and to have all their support... For them to still be following, still be engaging after all this time is just the greatest blessing. There's no way to thank people properly for all that. The best way is to just keep creating music that they love. I'm just so grateful that so many people from my hometown have been so supportive.

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