New member chosen for council

District 1 seat goes to smart-growth advocate

Posted 5/23/16

On May 17, a new Lone Tree City Council was sworn into office. Jackie Millet's switch from District 1 council representative to her new position as mayor left the council short one member. On April 7, the city posted a notice announcing that …

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New member chosen for council

District 1 seat goes to smart-growth advocate

Posted

On May 17, a new Lone Tree City Council was sworn into office. Jackie Millet's switch from District 1 council representative to her new position as mayor left the council short one member. On April 7, the city posted a notice announcing that applications were being accepted for candidates to serve out the remaining two years of Millet's term.

After a series of interviews with candidates, the members of the new council narrowed a field of seven to one, Henry “Jay” Carpenter.

Carpenter has lived in Lone Tree for 16 years, ever since moving to Colorado in 2000. He and his wife, Melissa, are raising their family in the city, and all four of his children were born at Sky Ridge Medical Center. He is an active parent and has coached his son's flag football team for eight seasons.

Originally from Villanova, outside Philadelphia, Carpenter received his bachelor's degree in communication from the University of Richmond in 1992 and for the last 12 years has been a financial adviser at Ameriprise Financial Services in Denver.

“I tend to help individuals and small business owners budget,” Carpenter said. “We budget their financial lives now as well as plan for their futures, plan for retirement or whatever financial goals they have.”

Carpenter feels that his background in financial services will be beneficial in helping the city budget and plan for its growth.

For the last 12 years, Carpenter has been involved with the Highlands Ranch and Lone Tree Relay for Life, a fundraiser benefiting the American Cancer Society.

“I've been involved with that in various capacities. I'm a former chair… and I've been on the committee for probably the last eight years,” he said.

Since 2010, Carpenter has also served as the vice chair and chair of the Lone Tree Advisory Recreation Committee, which led to increased involvement with the city council, mayor and city staff.

“That's what got me involved with the city itself, and then I realized I was ready to take it to the next level and get involved in a greater capacity. When I became aware of the opening, I thought I'd throw my hat in the ring,” he said. “It was a formal application, and then I had to sit down for an interview with the current city council.”

Following his panel interview, Carpenter was notified that he had been chosen to fill the seat vacated by Millet and was sworn in on May 17.

“I was very excited,” he said.

Carpenter's motto is "smart growth," and he grasps the lasting ramifications of the council's decisions for the city as Lone Tree expands to the east.

“There is going to be some tremendous growth going on in the city in the years ahead, and I just want to make sure it's responsible growth, smart growth, well thought out. In line with how the city has it laid out in its charter and to tie in nicely with what has already taken place,” he said.

Carpenter hopes to continue serving long after he has served out the remainder of Millet's term.

“I'm not planning on just a two-year stand in,” Carpenter said. “I'm planning on making a difference for the foreseeable future.”

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