Public input sought for Lone Tree regional park

Future public space will span 80 acres east of Interstate 25

Jessica Gibbs
jgibbs@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 4/6/21

Planning is underway for a whopping new regional park in Lone Tree, and the public can help shape its design. The 80-acre park will be located east of Interstate 25 and south of RidgeGate Parkway. …

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Public input sought for Lone Tree regional park

Future public space will span 80 acres east of Interstate 25

Posted

Planning is underway for a whopping new regional park in Lone Tree, and the public can help shape its design.

The 80-acre park will be located east of Interstate 25 and south of RidgeGate Parkway. The project will take several years to complete and it's unclear when work might begin, but some features such as a playground, gathering spaces, trails and sports fields are already planned.

South Suburban Parks and Recreation and the City of Lone Tree are asking people to suggest what else should be built there. An amphitheater? A water feature? People have until April 9 to weigh in at ssprd.org/public-input.

“Listening and learning from our residents allows us to deliver better projects,” Lone Tree Mayor Jackie Millet said in a news release. “This community engagement effort, led by our great partner and recreation provider South Suburban, will elevate the development of Lone Tree's centerpiece park.”

The regional park will sit next to a future residential development called SouthWest Villlage. Residents will begin calling SouthWest Village home in 2022. Plans calls for 1,900 new homes, commercial space, 236 acres of open space and another three neighborhood parks in addition to the regional park.

In an informational video about the project, landscape architect Mark Taylor of The Architerra Group explained how a regional park differs from a neighborhood park. That mainly boils down to the park's size, the number of features at the park and the number of people the park is planned to accommodate, he said.

A neighborhood park is typically 5 to 10 acres, offers playgrounds and play fields, and is within walking or short driving distance for nearby residents.

A regional park is typically at least 50 acres, includes natural areas, sports fields and large playgrounds, and draws people from a wider area or region than the adjacent neighborhood. A regional park may also boast amenities like ice skating or bike trails.

SouthWest Village and the regional park are part of a larger development called RidgeGate East, planned to include two other residential areas and the Lone Tree City Center.

“South Suburban looks forward to creating more recreation opportunities in the City of Lone Tree,” South Suburban Executive Director Rob Hanna said in a release. “The 80-acre regional park will be the cornerstone of the new development and we will work diligently to meet the wants and needs of the community.”

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