SCL Health pulls Lone Tree application

Posted 10/25/19

SCL Health, the health care group wanting to build a hospital near Park Meadows mall, withdrew its rezoning application 17 days after it received approval from the Lone Tree planning commission, …

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SCL Health pulls Lone Tree application

Posted

SCL Health, the health care group wanting to build a hospital near Park Meadows mall, withdrew its rezoning application 17 days after it received approval from the Lone Tree planning commission, according to Lone Tree officials.

SCL Health officials stated timing and input from the community and key stakeholders created “too much uncertainty going forward.”

SCL Health, a faith-based, nonprofit company based in Broomfield, proposed to build a 25-acre medical campus on a plot of land currently zoned for commercial use. The property is on Park Meadows Drive, west of Yosemite Street and south of C-470.

On Oct. 8, the Lone Tree Planning Commission approved SCL Health's application to rezone the land for planned development use, which would allow certain special uses like a patient tower reaching 110 feet and a helicopter pad.

Steve Chyung, senior vice president of real estate and supply chain for SCL Health, released a statement Oct. 25 on the decision.

“Ultimately, making a decision to purchase the land by the end of the year coupled with questions about the project's ultimate approval creates too much uncertainty for us to move forward,” the statement reads. “We appreciate the open dialogue and feedback from the city and local community members whose input was key in making an informed decision. SCL Health remains committed to our patients in the South Denver Metro area and will continue to invest in ways we can serve their needs in the future.”

Austin Good, Lone Tree's assistant to the city manager, released a statement on behalf of the city Oct. 25.

“Lone Tree prides itself on the community we've built with our residents, institutions and businesses. The city appreciates the residents that engaged themselves in the development process and thanks SCL Health for their interest in investing in Lone Tree. As SCL Health has withdrawn their application, the item will not be acted on by city council at the Nov. 5 meeting.”

Dozens turned out Oct. 8 to speak before the planning commission in a meeting that lasted nearly four hours. Residents were concerned about a variety of things with the hospital, particularly traffic, noise and necessity. Lone Tree is home to many medical office buildings and hospitals, the flagship being Sky Ridge Medical Center, just two miles from the proposed location.

Many of the upset attendees were from Acres Green, a neighborhood in unincorporated Douglas County just outside city limits that was closer to the hospital than any Lone Tree neighborhood. Jean Henke, of the Acres Green HOA, said in an email Oct. 25 that “the residents I heard from are quite happy.”

During the planning commission meeting, SCL Health revealed amended plans to the original document after holding two community open houses. It reduced the operating square footage and the maximum height requirement. Additionally, SCL Health was prepared to create a community advisory board and donate 9% of its revenues toward a community benefit program.

The land is still zoned for commercial use and is privately owned.

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