The lump at Lonesome Pine

Posted 10/31/19

Whenever it snows, a lump appears at the big hill at Lonesome Pine Park. The mound of snow sculpted by neighborhood kids is a famous launching pad for those who take their sleds out. Over the course …

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The lump at Lonesome Pine

Posted

Whenever it snows, a lump appears at the big hill at Lonesome Pine Park. The mound of snow sculpted by neighborhood kids is a famous launching pad for those who take their sleds out.

Over the course of a snow day, like the first one of the year called Oct. 30, the lump is shaped by butts on sleds using the extra foot of elevation to send them soaring for a moment as they descend into the bowl at the hill's bottom.

The famous sledding hill in the Acres Green neighborhood, just west of Lone Tree city limits, is a spot where kids — some who come from as far as Parker — flock to for the best snow to ride down.

No one knows how the lump gets there every time, it just always is, always near the top third of the steepest part of the hill — just low enough to gain enough speed approaching it, but just close enough where it's difficult to second guess and bail out.

As the lump is used and molded by dozens of kids throughout the day, it begins to resemble more of a ramp. The snow melts and freezes over and gets packed tighter with each passing sledder, making for faster lift-offs and longer hangtimes.

When the sledding is really good, a second ramp begins construction somewhere along the hill to handle the traffic, though it's typically not as structurally sound as the original lump.

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